Beatle Videos

The Beatles - Don't Let Me Down

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Written by John as an expression of his love for Yoko Ono, the song is heartfelt and passionate. As John told Rolling Stone magazine in 1970, “When it gets down to it, when you’re drowning, you don’t say, ‘I would be incredibly pleased if someone would have the foresight to notice me drowning and come and help me,’ you just scream.”

During filming on the roof of Apple, two days after the recording of the track, the band played ‘Don’t Let Me Down’ right after doing two versions of 'Get Back’ and it led straight into 'I’ve Got A Feeling’. Michael Lindsay-Hogg was once again directing a Beatles’ shoot. He and Paul met regularly at the tail end of 1968, while Hogg was directing The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus, to discuss the filming of The Beatles’ session in January. By the time that fateful Thursday came around, the penultimate day of January would be the last time The Beatles ever played together in front of any kind of audience.

This is not the version of ‘Don’t Let Me Down’ heard on the single but the version from the Let It Be… Naked album – a composite of both versions that were performed on the roof of Apple in Savile Row.


The Beatles - Hey Jude

The Beatles 1 Video Collection is out now.
Available on: http://www.thebeatles.com/

Hey Jude topped the charts in Britain for two weeks and for 9 weeks in America, where it became The Beatles longest-running No.1 in the US singles chart as well as the single with the longest running time.

The Beatles did not record their promotional film until Hey Jude had been on sale in America for a week. They returned to Twickenham Film Studio, using director Michael Lindsay-Hogg who had worked with them on Paperback Writer and Rain. Earlier still, Lindsay-Hogg had directed episodes of Ready Steady Go! And a few months after the film for Hey Jude he made The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus TV special that featured John and Yoko but wouldn’t be shown until 1996

To help with the filming an audience of around 300 local people, as well as some of the fans that gathered regularly outside Abbey Road Studios were brought in for the song’s finale. Their presence had an unlikely upside for The Beatles in their long-running saga with the Musicians’ Union in that the MU were fooled into believing the band were playing live, when in fact they were miming for the vast majority of the song. Paul, however, sang live throughout the song.

The video was first broadcast on David Frost’s Frost On Sunday show, four days after it was filmed. At that point transmission was in black and white although the promo was originally shot in color. It was first aired in America a month later on 6 October 1968, on The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour.


The Beatles - Revolution

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“When you talk about destruction, don’t you know that you can count me out"

“I did the slow version and I wanted it out as a single: as a statement of The Beatles’ position on Vietnam and The Beatles’ position on revolution. For years, on The Beatles’ tours, Brian Epstein had stopped us from saying anything about Vietnam or the war.” - John Lennon.

“Plugging directly into the Abbey Road desk and pushing the needles into the red achieved the fuzz-guitar sound. According to George Martin “We got into distortion on that, which we had a lot of complaints from the technical people about. But that was the idea: it was John’s song and the idea was to push it right to the limit. Well, we went to the limit and beyond.”

“Revolution" was directed by Michael Lindsay-Hogg, and filmed on the 4th September 1968 at Twickenham Film Studios.

“Don’t you know it’s gonna be all right”

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Music video by The Beatles performing Revolution. (C) 2015 Calderstone Productions Limited (a division of Universal Music Group) / Apple Films Ltd.


The Beatles - We Can Work it Out

"In We Can Work It Out, Paul did the first half, I did the middle eight. But you've got Paul writing, 'We can work it out, we can work it out' - real optimistic, y'know, and me impatient, 'Life is very short and there's no time for fussing and fighting my friend'." (John Lennon)

'We Can Work It Out' became The Beatles' sixth single in a row to top the US charts. At the time, no other band had achieved such success. The track took over 11 hours to perfect - up to this point, that was the longest period The Beatles had spent in the studio on a single song.

At Twickenham Film Studios, a little over three weeks after the single was recorded, The Beatles made three separate promo films for 'We Can Work It Out'. Like all the other films shot that day, the medium was two-inch black and white videotape, a relatively new format for the time. Many TV stations, however, weren't set up for videotape, so 16mm copies were made for distribution worldwide.

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The Beatles - Penny Lane

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Two days after recording some overdubs for 'A Day In The Life', The Beatles spent the afternoon in East London at Angel Lane, Stratford, filming scenes for the video of 'Penny Lane' with Scandinavian director, Peter Goldmann.

Shortly after the East London shoot, Goldmann and The Beatles headed to Knole Park, the grounds of a stately home in Kent, to film scenes of the band horse-riding in the countryside. Around this time, Goldmann and his crew (but minus The Beatles) travelled to Liverpool to shoot the sequences near to Penny Lane.

A few days before filming started for 'Penny Lane', Goldmann shot a promo for 'Strawberry Fields Forever'. Both shoots presented a challenge for everyone involved owing to the Musicians' Union ban on any action that could be construed as miming. Despite these limitations, both the films Goldmann made were so innovative that neither would have looked out of place on MTV a decade and a half later.

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The Beatles - A Day In The Life

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“If you listen to my playing, I try to become an instrument; play the mood of the song. For example, ‘Four thousand holes in Blackburn, Lancashire,’ - boom ba bom. I try to show that; the disenchanting mood. The drum fills are part of it.” Ringo Starr

Of very few individual songs can it be said, ‘This changed the course of popular music.’ ‘A Day In The Life’ is one such song.

Recorded in January and February 1967, a large orchestra was assembled for the amazing additional flourishes and fills, although at first the 40 classically trained musicians struggled with the concept of what they were being asked to play.

George Martin and Paul conducted the orchestra and helped to create a finished track that was more than just different, it was utterly unique. Starting from John’s beautiful song, the end result was something simply unbelievable.

As you can see from the film, this was no ordinary recording session. The classical musicians, who had been asked to wear evening dress, took it upon themselves to wear fake noses, funny hats and generally enter into the spirit of the occasion. Filmed between 8pm and 1am with guests including Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, the occasion provided some of the inspiration for what transpired during the recording and filming of ‘All You Need Is Love’ for the Our World project.

You can find out more and pre-order at http://www.thebeatles.com


The Beatles - Hello, Goodbye

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When The Beatles began recording what would become their third single to be released in 1967, its working title was ‘Hello, Hello’. The single sat at No.1 in both the UK and America for the first three weeks of 1968.

Paul directed the promotional film for ‘Hello, Goodbye’, remarking later: “Directing a film is something that everyone always wants to get into. It was something I’d always been interested in, until I actually tried it. ... There was so much of that going on – so many decisions to be made – that I ended up hating it.”

“I just ran out there: ‘Get a shot of this! Do this for a bit now! Let’s have a shot there! Get a close-up of him! Get the girls on their own! Go back there! Get a wide angle! We’ll edit it, we’ll make it work.’”

The video debuted on the Ed Sullivan Show, Sunday 26 November 1967.

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The Beatles - Revolution (Michael Lindsay-Hogg Interview)

The Beatles 1 Video Collection is Out Now.
Get your copy here: http://thebeatles1.lnk.to/DeluxeBluRay

Music video by The Beatles performing Revolution (Michael Lindsay-Hogg Interview). (C) 2015 Calderstone Productions Limited (a division of Universal Music Group) / Apple Films Ltd.